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by longtime citi executive michael corbat. he most recently headed the bank's middle eastern and european division. pandit not only gave up his c.e.o. position, but he also quit the board of directors. the news comes in the heart of earnings season for financial firms and just one day after citi reported stronger than expected earnings. shares of citi climbed 1.6%, closing at their highest price since march. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at pandit's tumultuous tenure. >> reporter: the citi management skeup had many people on wall street scratching their heads today about the timing. not only is the big bank finally regaining its footing, but there were no hints about the boardroom shuffle during vikram pandit's conference call yesterday on earnings. but 24 hours later, citi's new c.e.o. michael corbat and citi chairman michael o'neill hosted a call of their own and explained what happened. so to be clear, today's changes do not reflect any desire to alter this strategic direction of city. >> o'neill and pandit have reportedly clashed on >> reporter: o'neill and pandit have reportedly
heating up, and one city's efforts to cool down. >> ifill: and ray suarez has the story of a mexican drug lord killed in a gunfight, and his corpse stolen from the funeral home. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who plunged penn state university into scandal by his sexual abuse of young boys over many years was sentenced today. the judge called his crime a "story of betrayal." jerry sandusky wore a red jail jump suit and a smile as he entered the center county courthouse this morning, less than two hours later, the sle was gone after the
people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water closed major commuter tunnels linking manhattan with otherboros contributing to the worst damage to the subway system in its 108 years. >> last night we could look down this street here and we saw the river coming toward us and it actually looked like something out of a movie. it was unbelievable. >> woodruff: equally unbelievable, winds of at least 80 miles an hour blew out the bright lights that usually dominate the manhattan skyline. some one million homes and businesses in and around the city lost power. today mayor michael bloomberg appealed for understanding amid warnings it could take days to restore all transit service and power. >> we have begun the work of clearing and reopening bridges and roadways both of which will take some time.
in syria are doing what they can to hp the wound aftern attack in the city of aleppo. at least three powerful explosions ripped through the center of the commercial capital. they killed more than 30 people. state run tv reports explosions occurred near an officer's club in the northern city. opposition forces are claiming responsibility. they say they used the car bombings to target officers and militias loyal to president bashar al assad. the free syrian army renewed its offensive last week in an effort to win control of aleppo. government forces responded with air strikes. a free syrian army said they mobilized 30,000 troops and 2,000 tanks for the battle. rebel fighters plan to carry out more simultaneous bombing attacks on the military. >>> plummeting value of iran's currency has triggered rare street clashes in the capital tehran. the protests jai alai growing public frustration with the government. scores of protesters clashed with riot police in the city's main bazaar on wednesday. they demanded the government stop the rial's plunge. it lost 70% of the value in the last year s
in syria's biggest city and commercial hub, aleppo. >> this is the most important battle in syria. through the battle of aleppo, we can see the future of the syrian revolution. >> narrator: by dawn, ghaith had reached a rebel staging post just a few miles outside of aleppo. fighters had just arrived fresh from battle. they call themselves the free syrian army. their commander, abu bakri, said they now controlled half the city but that government forces were advancing. >> (translated): the day before yesterday, there was increased artillery shelling and shooting of mortars and mig planes attacked. we've retreated to create a second defensive line so we can counterattack. >> narrator: abu bakri never expected to be a rebel commander. >> (translated): i finished compulsory military service in 2006, and by allah's grace went on to study economics at the university of aleppo. that was me until the revolution started. >> takbir. >> allahu akbar. >> takbir. >> allahu akbar. >> narrator: ghaith continued his journey into aleppo. abu bakri said god willing he'd see him on the front line in two days
: in new york city officials shut down all transit services and ordered nearly 400,000 people to evacuate low-lying areas. hours before sandy hit, high water blew on to the board walk in battery park at the southern tip of manhattan. high winds also left a construction crane dangling from the top of a 55-story building. even the stock market closed due to weather for the first time in nearly 30 years. it will remain closed tomorrow. the nation's capital followed sut, shuttin down public transportation, schools, and federal offices. president obama canceled a campaign rally in florida and flew back to washington, appearing early this afternoon to promise federal help. >> i'm extraordinarily grateful for the cooperation of our state and local officials. the conversations that i've had with all the governors indicate that at this point there are no unmet needs. i think everybody is taking this very seriously. we've got... prepositioned all the resources that we need. but right now the key is to make sure that the public is following instructions. keep in mind that for folks who are not follo
in the heart of the city since 1976 rising 124 meters high, it is a local landmark. soon, though, it is going to stanld out for another reason. from january ivy and other greenery will slowly start to cover the walls until it reaches the very top. >> translator: it will be great to see so much green in a major city like this. >> translator: when it is completed, it will be one of the city's landmarks. >> the project is the brain child of leading architect undo born and raised in osaka. >> translator: i think seeing greenery will make a powerful impact. >> instead of just designing new buildings he has a bigger vision for the environment. he has begun several projects to bring more greenery into osaka. this riverside area has been turned into a popular spot for cherry blossom viewing. since 2004 ando has raised some $6.4 million to make this project a reality. he strongly believes osaka needs more flowers and green spaces. >> there is no greenery. it is dirty. there are homeless people everywhere. there are few jobs. that is the perception of osaka. i want to improve its image. >> for the past
. hurricane sandy brings the city that never sleeps to its knees, leaving millions without power. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. wall street is working on a comeback with plans to reopen stock trading tomorrow, despite heavy flooding in lower manhattan. >> susie: from crippled transportation throughout the northeast to canceled flights, the federal response and potential election impact. we'll have all that and more right here on nbr! >> tom: hurricane sandy is now super-storm sandy as it clashes with another weather system, bringing wind, rain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the death toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the stor
growth. >> so is this going to be the theme when we get a new batch of earnings next week? we have city reporting on monday, then bank of america on tuesday, also goldman saks and more gag stanley reporting on the investment banking side. what do you think we're going to hear from those companies? >> okay, so it's the inand yang of banking in the world of quantitative easing. on the one side this interest-rate environment is tough. the spread between deposits and loans narrowing. on the other hand there's pret good activity, housing is picking up, credit is getting better. as we look at the bank earnings we have to differentiate who is hit by that net interest margin issue and who can benefit on the other side. we look at citi and think they can report a good monday on positive-- monday so that could be positive. on the other hand bank of america facing pressures from the deposit versus lending squeeze. >> you told me citi was your top recommendation right now. tell us why? >> well, we look at citi and it's a bank that has not performed as well as some of those other tough ones like ban
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: orhan pamuk is here, the nobel prize winning author of "my name is red," "snow" and the museum of innocence" has just had another novel translated into english. "silent house" was written in turkish almost three decades ago. it is set in the summer of 1980 in the leader of tuey's cup. fati is vised by her children. they enter into a deep darkness which is visible between the wings of the big front door. pamuk has also published "the innocence of objects," the catalog to the museum of innocence in istanbul which opened early this year. i am pleased to have this friend of our program back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: we visited in istanbul, visitors are making us happy. everything is fine with the museum. >> rose: has everything changed in your life since i saw you? >> i returned back to my writerly persona. so in many so many programs i told you between the ages of seven and 22 i wanted to be a painter then. between 22 to now i'm writing novels but the dead artist in me came out, i planned this novel and
and the city is blessed with social resources. >> he added it could be difficult for the factory to keep producing medical equipment if it remained. >>peoplen japaare focused on overcoming the disaster of 2011. they have to rebuild homes and communities. we'll show you their struggles and successes every wednesday at 1:00 p.m. >>> germans are on a mission to make their country neuuclear fr. they lead the world in solar power generation. they also rely on wind. germany's investing heavily in offshore wind farms that can yield four times as much power as land base sources. now it's trying to figure out the next step. >> reporter: by 2020 the country aims to have 2,000 of these wind mills in the north sea and baltic sea. the north port sea is home to have the latest wind power research. now that offshore wind has become viable commercially, researchers in companies from all over the world are coming here to find out more. >> the idea of the floating technology is to be independent some three types would be suitable for installations and in the chinese sea or around japan. >> reporter: it's
actually have my say on their mind. france's second-largest city has always had a bit of a dodgy reputation. drug trafficking and crimes is big in marseille, just like in any of the port city, and the gangs that dominate the scene have been involved in a brutal war for months now. more than 20 people have been killed since the beginning of this year. >> the northern district of marseille are rundown and neglected. drug gangs rule supreme here. they control entire housing estates, guarding the entrance is. we would not have dared to come here unaccompanied. the streets are no go areas. normally camera crews are driven away forcibly. we have a former police officer with us. he investigated crime here for 20 years. he and his colleagues were not often successful, but they managed to catch some dealers. over time, he got to know their methods. >> look to the left -- that is a place where they sell drugs. there's one of the lookouts waiting for customers. the lookouts watch to see which cars drive by. the system works like a road block. they are responsible for keeping unwanted visitors out and
of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: evan thomas is here, an author, a journalist and a professor at princeton. he has written on topics including robert kennedy, barack obama, the ci and wise men in his latest book he turns to president eisenhower, thomas sheds light on aspects of eisenhower's personality that have often been overlooked, he examines how the president's tactical skill informed his leadership and his foreign policy, the book is called ike's bluff, president eisenhower's secret bttle to save the world, i am pleased to have evan thomas back at this table. welcome. >> charlie. >> rose: why do you call it ike's bluff? >> well, he was running a big bluff. he was bluffing with nuclear weapons. >> rose: meaning what? >> meaning ike's central insight was that he didn't want to fight any wars, not little wars, not immediate wars, he didn't want to fight any wars but the ways to avoid that was to threaten
town, but the economic recession has dragged the city down. work has been suspended at nearly all of the construction sites downtown,heth ty be schools, hospitals, or other projects. university fees have nearly doubled. the regional government is cutting costs wherever it can. politicians have racked up 40 billion euros in debt. the problem is catalonia has to pay so much money to the spanish national government in madrid. at least that is what independence supporterssay. she is uneloye she has a degree in biology and has never been that interested in politics until now. recently, she got involved in the newly founded catalonian national assembly. >> it was the crisis that first convinced a lot of people that an independent catalonia would be good for us. there would be more jobs, a better educational system, and a better health system. lots of people who did not support independence ithe past due now. >> but independence is a charge word in the spanish capital madrid. the mood is especially testy in front of the city of bullfighting arena. heavily criticized by animal rights acti
's biggest cities, travel hubs and several major gasoline refineries along the new jersey and delaware coasts. financial centers like the nasdaq and new york stock exchange, say they'll have contingency plans iplace. electronic trading is expect continue as normal. michael barry says insurance companies are already mobilizing to deal with damage from hurricane sandy. he's vice president, with the insurance information institute. >> what are insurance companies doing to be prepared? >> well, right now they're trying to figure out exactly where this storm is going to make landfall. as indicated they have mobile catastrophe units sent to the scene so that the insure can gout andate to their policy holders, help them file claims after the storm hits. right now, the big question is where is this going to hit? i saw a modeling company saying delaware, maryland, virginia, and moving west into populated cities like philadelphia. >> susie: it's covering a wide swath of states, and we're hearing there will be heavy floods and strong winds. so, you know, what's covered and what's not covered once it's a
insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global predicts that if the areas affected by sandy lose a quarter of their output for just two days, it would knock about $25 billion off u.s. economic growth in the fourth quarter. that could be as much a 0.6%. but longer-term, some of the financial losses should be recovered by repair and rebuilding efforts. home improvement stores like home depot and lowes will likely get a boost in sales. many construction jobs will be created to rebuild homes and businesses. and governments will be spending huge amounts of money to repair subways, roads, and bridges so all of those efforts should help boost economic activity early next year. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now for a closer look at sandy's economic impact, mark zandi, chief economist at moody's analytics. you know, mark, people often hear that when there's a sdater like zandi, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be
. tonight's missing issue is europe's debt crisis. >> brown: an ancient and historic city at risk in a modern-day civil war. we look at the destruction in aleppo, syria. >> this is one of the great tragedies. aleppo's an extraordinary cross roads of cultures, religions, all built on a strata of centuries of -- >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a 19th century recording made on tinfoil by thomas edison, digitally converted so we can hear it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing supp
sales. it unveiled its much anticipated new operating system, windows 8, here in new york city, and showed off its new tablet, the surface. the opering stem key feature-- an ability to work across all computers: tablets, laptops and desktops. over one billion hours of testing time went into the new operating system and the surface tablet. c.e.o. steve ballmer calls them a milestone in computing. >> with windows 8, we've brought together the best of worlds-- the p.c. and the tablet; your work, life, and play. windows 8 will help you do everything, and it will make it a lot of fun, frankly, to do nothin one device now combines the greatest qualities with the p.c. with the greatest qualities of the tablet experience. >> susie: joining us now with more on tablets, and those apple earnings, david garrity, head of his own tech research firm, gva research. david, you have been a real strong recommender of apple stock. any change in your thinking because of those earnings today and the disappointment? >> susie, no. for a couple simple reasons. first off, applewith their announcement ea
. the accident forced thousands to flee the towns and cities around the nuclear plant. some foreign residents in the northeast ended up leaving japan but many have returned to the places they once called home. nhk world tracks one woman's journey. >> bear. brown bear. >> sarah jones is from texas. >> one, two, three, four, five, six, seven. >> reporter: she's teaching english at elementary and junior high schools. >> reporter: she was first drawn to japan by its natural beauty and culture. last year she was in the teachers' room at her high school when she felt the most intense earthquake she'd ever experienced. she left the school and went home. sarah speaks some japanese. but she couldn't make out the insistent announcements on the tv. she looked up a word and found it meant "evacuation." she's close to the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant, and residents were being ordered to flee. she took shelter at an elementary school more than 60 kilometers from town. >> i evacuated with people. i was the only foreigner here. and no one spoke english. so it's a little lonely, i think. >> reporter: in he
year, but not this year. our managers are telling us to cut the costs down. >> reporter: the city of dongguan in the coastal region is home to factories making clothes for overseas markets. surprisingly, a business is booming in this town. rows and rows of sewing machines are on sale at this machinery store and came from nearby clothing factories. clothes makers are going bankrupt in increasing numbers amid struggling exports stemming from europe's debt crisis. >> translator: so many firms are going under. that's why we're getting so many of these secondhand sewing machines. >> reporter: at this trade fair some 25,000 companies are trying to promote exports. the european crisis is casting a dark shadow. this company makes slides for large four-wheel drive vehicles. exports accounted for 95% of the products it mfrds, but they have been showing a significant decline. >> translator: we are seeing a particularly sharp drop in east europe from the way orders are falling, our exports in the future are going to show a precipitous decline. >> reporter: now there is another reason for worr
students and a former were buried alive. the city was struck by an earthquake last month that killed more than 80 people. the quake may have loosened the ground where the land slide occurred. china is currently in the middle of an eight day holiday period that began with national foundation day. the elementary school stayed open to make up for days missed after the quake. >>> the international group of hackers has leaked some 120,000 bits of university it claims was stolen from universities. the hacker claims it broke into the systems at 100 major universities and posted personal information on a website. the data stolen from the university of tokyo may contain e-mail of staff members. they school admits it's found indications of outside intrusion sp into its system and says some e-mail arsddresses were leaked. >>> it has been bringing some heavy rain down for the last several days as it's lingered here. it's looking like lit be heading into an easterly direction toward vietnam where it's expected to make landfall. it's moving very slowly at the moment. the winds are at 72 kilometers an h
help revive the spirit of a city with a rich jazz history. fast forward six years to march 2011. this time musicians in japan's northeast are struck by disaster. the tsunam pummelled the port and taking away the instruments of the city jazz band. they swing dolphins couldn't swing anymore. a month after the disaster the dolphins were back on stage and playing new instruments most of them donated thanks to the efforts of jazz musicians in new orleans. the o. perry walker high school band never forgot the help they received after katrina. they organized congress serts to raise money for their japanese friends. >> i was in the sam predicament five, six years ago and it gives us the opportunity to help them like they helped us. >> many of us lost our instruments. we were able to play again. i was so excited. >> reporter: these young people relate to one another through music and through the experience they've had dealing with the disaster. >> translator: if we didn't have music, i don't think we could have overcome the disaster. i'm glad i had music in my life. >> translator: there
central bank intervenes in the business. in september, 2010, in new york city, the premr and china'econic czar said china keeps its currency low in order to give a trade advantage to its manufacturerrers. manufacturers. we should brand it as a currency manipulator. >> you heard the president say the currency has depreciated? >> i think it is a serious problem to brand them a currency manipulator. a lot of countries intervene to affect the value of their currency. japan has many times, and so has many others. we haven't branded any of thea currency manipulator ev. secondly, the chinese currency is what the market price would be. you see that reflected in china's current account balance. the bottom line is the current account balance is well within the standards that we, ourselves, have advocated, saying if it is within those standards it really is not a big problem. the obama administration has pressured china from the start on currency values. they are now close to the market rate. but the issue is two-fold: one, currency value is not, by any means, the biggest issue in u.s./china
,000 new yorkers who live close to the water have already left. city officials have shut down the transit system. businesses and shops have closed. workers are piling up sand bags in front of subway entrances and buildings. >> it's vr important. this is the stop the water from gog into the subway. >> irene last year didn't look like this after it hit. >> they expect the storm will pound a wide area for several days. >> sandy has interacted with cold air from the north and it's become a post tropical cyclone. it's not a tropical cyclone anymore but the field of heavy rain and strong winds are expanding and things will get even worse bause the center of a former hurricane sandy is expected to move into the new jersey coast. extremely dangerous storm surge combined with high tide could cause flooding. that's why hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to evacuate. it's going to move through pennsylvania into new york city. rain will spread as much as 2000 millimeters with 300 millimeters possibly into wednesday. temperatures are on the chilly side. look at this only 8 degrees in wa
taking a closer look. nhk world's hideki yui reports from islamabad. >> reporter: sialkot is a city in eastern pakistan. a factory, 150 men make uniforms for judo and karate. they work for japanese company that moved its production base here in july from china. >> translator: we are starting to receive orders from companies in europe as well as japan. because of rising costs in china. >> pakistan's population is set to keep growing for the foreseeable future. more and more japanese companies see it as the promising market. they have formed a joint venture with a local firm. their new factory began operations this month. the plant will manufacture steel sheets used inutomobiles and elecic appliances. >> translator: this is a huge market of 180 million people. but per capita steel consumption is just 38 kilograms. we can expect the use of steel to grow sharply as people buy more cars, motorbikes and appliances. >> reporter: the biggest obstacle to doing business in pakistan is poor security. in the southern city of karachi, gun crime is ramp aant. >> in karachi, they usually take arme
winds pounded ocean city maryland and they said all along their biggest worry by far is flooding. >> this is what you get on the flip side of hurricane sandy, snow. >> and it hasn't stopped all night. >> the storm has caused the cancellation of 14,000 flights across the country. >> do we know how this storm may affect vote something. >> this is a frantic time for both campaigns to a pause is something they want to get over with fast. >> hopefully your thoughts and prayers will join with mine, to think about those folks who are in harm's way. a. great thing about america iss like this, we all stick together, the good news is we will clean up and we will get through this. >> we turn now to politics with mark halperin of time magazine, who is also the best selling author of game change. >> if this storm hadn't happened we would be seeing wall-to-wall coverage of one of the most exciting finishes to a presidential election in the television age. we are not going to see as much of that, certainly through the weekend. which means whichever candidate was going to befit more fr national
has been transported to hospital in the city. at first he closes himself off to the japanese, but tender care from a japanese nurse has his resolve. eventually the two fall in love. the idea for the musical was hatched after a russian gold coin that is more than 100 years old was discovered. the coin was found on the grounds of a hospital where russian prisoners of war were treated. engraved on the coin are the names of a japanese woman and a russian man. research proved these people existed. the woman was a japanese nurse. the man a soldier from russia. the coin appears to be a piece of love between the two. the japanese set of prisoner of war camps during the war. some inmates were free to sickle in the city and bathe in local hot springs because of the locals kind treatment, the prisoners flourished. the actor who plays nicolai visits a russian cemetery before sitting out for moscow. >> translator: the people who are resting here wanted to return to their homeland but could t. they must have felt very sad. i came here to tell them that we would help fulfill their yearnings
, small neighborhood gardens are also popping up all over the city on previously abandoned lots and even in some residents' backyards. this past summer, 30,000 teenage volunteers -- unmistakable in their in brightly colored t-shirts -- arrived in new orleans from lutheran congregations across the country to help till and plant. sanjay kharod works to connect local residents with organizations and groups, like these lutheran volunteers, that can help them grow food. >> there's a long history of growing in the city, and what we're trying to do is we're trying to encourage people to do that again. >> reporter: by and large, residents have reacted enthusiastically. >> i go to the store, if i decide to buy me some strawberry, pop one of them open, taste it, and there's no taste to it. you know, and i grew strawberries in my yard and picked that, and they're nice and sweet. >> reporter: food deserts have become more numerous in new orleans since the hurricane. according to the congressional hunger center, the average grocery store here now serves 16,000 people -- twice the national average. no
of this month in the city hosting the u.s. air base. the two suspects were sysed there. okinawa city officials encourage residents to voice their concerns and anger. they say they're expecting about 1,500 participants. >>> people have responded to japan's disaster and its aftermath in many ways. media report on it. academics study it. artists base works on it. one filmmaker picked up his camera soon after last year's earthquake and tsunami and headed to the northeast. he wanted to forge ties with survivors. so he called his documentary "katawara," which means "on your side" in japanese. >> reporter: "katawara" has no narration and no dramatic story development. the camera just travels through japan's northeast and documents the aftermath of the disaster. showing people going about their daily lives, capturing the changing of the seasons. shin ichiase directed the film. he's spent decades making documentaries featuring people who face challenges. he focuses on the preciousness of human life and the importance of individuals. the march 2011 disaster was the subject he couldn't ignore. >> transla
people in america who are out of work, but still ahead, i'll introduce you to two new york city firms that can't hire workers fast enough. >> tom: the federal government made what it called one of the largest medicare fraud crackdowns today, arresting dozens of people across seven cities, accusing them of cheating medicare out of $430 million. today's busts involved 91 people, including doctors, nurses, and hospital administrators, including these arrests in miami. among the scams-- the president of riverside general hospital in houston and his son are accused of giving medicare patients food and cigarettes for claiming to get hospital care, but instead watched tv or played games. federal prosecutors said that scheme led to $158 million in fake bills. today's acon, annound by the justice department, stretched from brooklyn to los angeles. >> this is something i think we see at a variety of levels. we see it among people who are health care professionals who take oaths to provide care and do no harm, and in fact they are doing great harm. we are going after people, whatever their posit
activity in september expanded modestly since the last snapshot. only new york and kansas city saw a leveling off or slowing of growth. residential real estate was the one major sweet spot, showing widespread improvement. >> we've seen a pickup in house prices, we've seen a pickup in construction activity, a little bit better demand for loans. so, it generally corroborates what we've been seeing in the economic reports on the housing market. >> reporter: conditions in the manufacturing sector were mixed, but somewhat improved since the last reading. meanwhile, the job market was little changed since the last report, which was the released in august. that was bit of a surprise, given the recent drop in the nation's unemployment rate. but, at least one economist says it suggests the lower jobless rate may not be sustainable. >> it doesn't appear that the labor market is really showing all that much fundamental improvement and that's not all that surprising given the uncertainty around the pending fiscal cliff at yearend, the upcoming election. >> reporter: today's new economic eviden
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. > roe: anderfograsmussen is here, he is the secretary general of nato, he was the prime minister of denmark for eight years before assuming his current post in 2009. he is in new york for the u.n. general assembly, nato has significantly redefined its mission since its founding in 1949. it's primarily-- last year it enforce add no-fly zone in libya and the campaign that overthrew moammar qaddafi. i'm pleased to have the secretary general at this table, welcome. tell me how you have defined the role for nato in the current environment, especially in the middle east. >> the core role is still to protect our citizens against any threat to their security we won the cold war. we protected our citizens against soviet communism, aggression. we won the cold war. the soviet broke down but after the end of the cold war we realized that we are faced we merging security challenges, terrorism, this is the reason why we are in afghanistan. that's why we are now building a nato missile defense system to p
. the city had been a power center for al-shabab, the group that's fought somalia's internationally backed government for years. al-shabab is allied with al- qaeda, but the militants now have been driven out of all of somalia's major cities. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the men at the top of the presidential tickets hunkered down again today for debate preparation, ahead of the big meeting tomorrow night. but they also managed to break away briefly-- president obama for a visit to the hoover dam, and governor romney out with an aide to buy lunch, a burrito. meanwhile, their running mates made multiple stops in key states. vice president biden told a crowd in charlotte, north carolina that mitt romney would raise taxes on most americans to fund tax cuts for the wealthy. >> how they can justify raising taxes on the middle class has been buried the last four years. how in lord's name can they justify raising their taxes with these tax cuts? look, folks, we've seen this movie before. massive tax cuts for the wealthy. eliminating restrictions on wal
at a russian orthodox cathedral. yekaterina samutsevich was mobbed by the media as she left the moscow city court. she vowed to fight for the release of the other two women, whose sentences of two years in prison were upheld. the case has been widely condemned in the u.s. and europe as part of a crackdown on dissent. toyota recalled more than seven million vehicles around the world today for a bad power- window switch that can fill the car with smoke. the action affects more than a dozen models made from 2005 through 2010. there have been more than 200 incidents reported in the u.s., but no crashes or injuries have resulted. toyota has been trying to recover from a series of recalls of some 14 million vehicles in recent years. car owners who have crashed in the last three years may have gotten counterfeit airbags as replacements, without knowing it. the national highway traffic safety administration warned today there's an extreme safety risk. it said at least 250,000 vehicles may have airbags that inflate only partially or not at all. car owners should check a webse for more i
residential building in the city. "the new york times" has dubbed it the global billionaire's club, and for good reason. at least two of the apartments are under contract fo more than 90 llio each. others, more modest, range in price from $45 million to more than $50 million. simultaneously, the powers that be have just awarded donald trump, yes, that donald trump, the right to run a golf course in the bronx which taxpayers are spending at least $97 million to build. what amounts to a public subsidy, says the indignant city comptroller for a luxury golf course. good grief. a handout to the pollute cotracts. this i a city where economic inequality rivals that of a third world country. of america's 25 largest cities new york is now the most unequal. the median income for the bottom 20% last year was less than $9,000. while the top 1% of new yorkers has an average income of $2.2 million across america this divide between the super rich and everyone else has become a yawning chasm. at no time in modern history has the top 100th of 1% owned more of our wealth or paid so low a tax rate.
city. here is the extended forecast. >>> that's all for this edition of "newsline." thanks for joining us.
record in california, climbing to $4.67 a gallon today, according to triple "a", but some cities are experiencing even higher prices. for drivers, the good news is prices are expected to fall, but california remains vulnerable to quick price hikes. refinery and pipeline problems have put the squeeze on supplies and california drivers. >> well its pretty crazy. >> i think it sucks. big time i mean its terrible" >> the went up pretty high from last week." >> they just jump them up real quick and then it takes forever to get them back down again it is pretty ridiculous. >> tom: today's average price in the state, $4.67 a gallon for regular unleaded. that's $0.50 higher than a week ago. $0.86 higher than the national average. wholesale gas prices fell today after california governor jerry brown yesterday eased the state's gas-blend requirements. the change allows refiners to start processing a less- expensive winter fuel blend today, about three weeks ahead of schedule. california's strict air quality standards require a specific gasoline blend that's not necessary in other states, r
brooklyn for its first medical facility. the number of freelancers in this new york city borough has increased 3,000% in the past decade. david himmelstein is a professor of public health at hunter college, and thinks the clinic is a good idea. his concern is whether the union's insurance plan can survive. >> when you set up an insurance plan and say anyone can join, basically you are likely to attract sick older people who can't get insurance elsewhere in the system. and over the long term, that has doomed similar insurance efforts in the past. >> reporter: but the freelancers union hopes its holistic approach to medicine and emphasis on preventive care will help lower healthcare costs. and that's good for insurance company and patient alike. >> this can really give people the kind of care they need, and it can also be much more economical, so we can make freelancers' dollars go further. >> reporter: if the pilot is successful, the freelancers union hopes to expand to other cities around the country. erika miller, nbr, brooklyn. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, we meet a woman who says she'
of young girls who had been swept up in sex trafficking and prostitution. >> reporter: angeles city is one of the asia's most notorious sex districts. even on a rainy evening, dozens of young wom were outside their establishments on the lookout for customers. >> don't touch me, ma'am. >> reporter: shay cullen cuts a promising customer profile around here, and on this night he was frequently accosted. in fact, the 74-year-old ireland-born dominican catholic priest has campaigned for four decades to clean up this district. the boom in commercial sex here dates back to the vietnam war, when the u.s. military greatly expanded its philippine bases nearby. today, father shay, as he's called around here, says 12,000 women work this strip. where do they come from primarily? >> the majority in this area are coming from north america. australia is quite big. koreans, there's special clubs here for the koreans, but also from europe. >> reporter: over the years, father cullens's people's recovery, empowerment and development -- or preda foundation -- has sheltered and rehabilitated thousands of young
rising above the central city's skyline as syrian government warplanes, tanks and artillery intensified their assault. meanwhile, turkish media reported syrian troops fired another mortar round into southern turkey. no one was hurt, but the turkish military returned fire. a similar exchange earlier this week left several dead on both sides. the turmoil deepened today in south africa's mining industry. the world's largest platinum producer, amplats, fired 12,000 miners for staging an unlawful strike. it was the latest turn in two months of labor unrest and violence in south africa. in august, police shot and killed 34 strikers working for another major platinum concern. nearly 80,000 miners are currently striking across the country. the highest court in britain ruled today that five terror suspects can be extradited to the u.s., including abu hamza al-masri. the radical muslim preacher, and the others, had fought extradition for years. al-masri's mosque in london was known as a training ground for radical islamists in the 1990s. he's accused of trying to set up a terror training camp in
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: next month, the chinese government will undergo its most important leadership transition in recent history. the event has raised questions about the country's political future. even osnos is a long time observer of china. in this week's new yorker magazine he writes about how the pail your of the country's railway industry reveals a dark side of chinese growth. it'scall "boss rail: the disaster exposed the underside of the boom." i'm pleased to have evan osnos back at this table. welcome. >> thanks, charlie. >> rose: tell us about this railway disaster and what it says. >> this was a train crash last summer that turned out to be more than trains. what happened was quite simple on its face. there were two trains going down a track on the southeastern city of when jo and they collided with each other. and we found out it was because there was a broken signal that failed in the thunderstorm and one train didn't know where the other train was. we've learned that in fact it was something much broader
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: valery gergiev is here, one of the world's most dynamic, admired and busiest conductors director of the treasured mariinsky theatre in russia, here he is performing tchaikovsky's fourth symphony with the orchestra. >> rose: he is in new york to lead the world orchestra for peace in tribute to the late george schultz at carnegie hall and also conduct the london symphony orchestra in a series of concerts devoted to brams, i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> thank you so much. >> rose: how did you come to take over this orchestra? >> it is an ensemble of absolute first class musician whose present good 40 or 50 countries, and these are countries in latin america, of course, north america, many, many from europe and quite many from asia, of course russia is there, also part of territory of soviet union, and i think it makes a very good statement every time for peace, for understanding between cultures, between nations, differe religious, different historical background,. >> rose: how well did yo
in the northern city of tripoli. tensions have also been fueled by a flood of syrian refugees into lebanon. in washington today, state department spokeswoman victoria nuland stopped short of blaming syria for today's attack, but she said lebanon is at risk of being destabilized again. >> we have been, for a number of weeks and, in fact, months now, that we've been concerned about increasing tensions inside of lebanon, particularly sectarian tensions and tensions as a result of spillover from syria. but don'wanto pr-jue before the lebanese authorities have had a chance to declare themselves who was responsible here. >> brown: there was no such reluctance back in lebanon, where sunnis burned tires in protest in cities across the country as news of the bombing spread. a short time ago, i spoke with abigail fielding smith of the "financial times" from beirut. abigail, welcome. tell us a bit more about the presumed target here, a top intelligence official. how has he stirred up enemies? > well, he waone of the st sior itellence officials in lebanon. and he was associated with a couple of partic
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